[HT * Checked, MEDIUM] Gregoire Lake (PNT) Natural Area


Gregoire Lake NA is made up of either three or five parcels of land. The lake is about 30 km southeast of Fort McMurray.

[FP, MYSTERY AREA, SEE MY EXPLANATION]

Screen capture from the SAPAA-Google Map of possibly two Gregoire Lake (PNT) sites.
Screen capture from the SAPAA-Google Map of possibly two Gregoire Lake (PNT) sites.

Map of the Area

Any maps and map views are for general information only. Do not rely on them for navigation or to determine legal boundaries.

Other Information

Alberta’s Protected Area definitions can be confusing. Such is the case with Gregoire Lake (PNT). This is a relatively small NA broken into three parcels of land; two of these are on the southwest shore of the lake and the third is south of Highway 881. Gregoire Lake First Nation Reservation 176 adjoins this site to the north and west [1].

PP, NA, PNT – Future TBD. There is another Gregoire Lake (PNT) which on our maps has Provincial Park (PP) designation has a type of PP or a provincial park. As it turns out, this is neither a NA nor a PP – but does have some acknowledgement for future recreational use. When queried, the Government of Alberta had this explanation (with edits):

Gregoire is not a natural area, it is identified for future recreation development. Alberta Environment and Protected Areas has placed CLR (crown land reservation) 130115 which is a regional plan commitment for no surface disposition as indicated in the Lower Athabasca Regional Plan. Restrictions apply to the area you indicated in efforts to make Recreation the priority rather than industrial commercial development [2].

(See List of Protected Areas for definitions of what is a PP, PNT, or Crown Reservations.) Similar confusion exists for Caslan (PNT) and North Buck Lake (PNT) Natural Area is similar. HT

Was Willow. Until the 1940s, Gregoire Lake was known as Willow Lake but was renamed for its outlet, the Gregoire River which was named for an early settler. Most water drains into the lake from the south via Surmont Creek and its tributaries. As well, there are six small streams that enter the lake at various points. The outflow, the Gregoire River, eventually flows into the Athabasca River via the Clearwater and Christina rivers [3].

An ANZAC in Alberta? The Gregoire Lake area was surveyed in about 1916 by the Australia-New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC), which named the hamlet of Anzac. Anzac became a stopover on the Northern Alberta Railway route between Cheecham Siding to the south, and the Mclnnis fish plant in Waterways Station, near Fort McMurray [3].

Local First Nations. The Fort McMurray Band of Cree and Chipewyan Indians has three treaty reserves on the lake, which cover a total of 1,304 ha. They are Gregoire Lake Reserves 176, 176A and 176B [3].

Site Statistics

Site NameGregoire Lake (PNT)
Site TypeNatural Area
SubtypeProtective Notation (PNT)
Natural Region(s)Central Mixedwood
O.C. No. (Land Ref. Manual)N/A
PASite ID (Map Ref #)391
Site # (Parks Website)N/A
Total Area47.48 ha. (117.33 ac.)
Steward-Status
Recreation Activities
IUCN
Operated By
Notes and Comments
Statistics and Details for Gregoire Lake (PNT) Natural Area
Site NameGregoire Lake (PP-PNT)
Site TypeProvincial Park
SubtypeProtective Notation (PNT)
Natural Region(s)Central Mixedwood
O.C. No. (Land Ref. Manual)N/A
PASite ID (Map Ref #)3915540 as per Chris
Site # (Parks Website)N/A
Total Area665.86 ha. (1645.37 ac.)
Steward-Status
Recreation Activities
IUCN
Operated By
Notes and Comments
Statistics and Details for Gregoire Lake (PP-PNT) Provincial Park

References

The following links are provided as a courtesy but are not verified or endorsed by SAPAA. Clicking on the link will cause you to leave the SAPAA website. Primary source of information is: Government of Alberta – [LINK] (All links accessed on 2023-01-DD).

  1. Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo, Land Ownership Map .
  2. Email exchange – Forestry Parks, and Tourism. “Re: SAPAA Asks – Gregoire Lake (FID 114)” Received by F.Potter, January 23, 2023.
  3. Mitchell, Patricia, and E. E. Prepas. “Atlas of Alberta Lakes.” Edmonton, Alberta: University of Alberta Press, 1990, pp. 140-145.

Further Reading

Editing, Review and Silence Procedure

  1. FRANK: Publish page
  2. HUBERT/PATSY: Assign page for editing by update tbd in the Title (4-
  3. Review for readability and alignment to SAPAA organizational reputation.
  4. Best available image
  5. Review for accuracy including:
    1. Correct map and site statistics
    2. Area size is correct
    3. Standards (e.g. use of hyphens, spelling, etc.)
    4. References are accessible and and notes match
  6. Review for formatting, e.g.: Centered captions, No empty blocks
  7. TEAM: Last walk through
    1. Any final discussion or notes
    2. Remove [name] from title
    3. Add to log book for silence procedure
    4. Delete these notes.

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